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Category: Announcements

Farewell, dear LIShost

Well, let’s try this again. DNS confusion meant that last Friday, when I thought I was all set, I actually wasn’t. But apparently NOW I’m all set, so here’s the post that I thought would get posted last week. (Many thanks to Reclaim Host tech support for all their extremely helpful help.)


I’m writing now from my new home on a new server and a new domain registrar for the first time in my blog’s history. Up until now I’ve been happily living in my own little corner of the LIShost server, carefully tended by the wonderful Blake Carver. Sadly, LIShost is shutting down after 18 years of dedicated service to library folks. I can’t thank Blake enough for his approach to hosting, giving me as much leeway as I had the skills for, and as much help as I needed to cover those areas where my skills were lacking.

But welcome, now, to my new home, here in my own corner of the Reclaim Hosting servers. If things continue as they have begun, I think I’ll be quite happy here in my new digs. But if you notice anything wonky do let me know. I’m still unpacking and figuring out the light switches and hanging pictures, and there’s no guarantee I’ll notice everything.

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Downloadable EndNote Output Styles for MLA 8th Edition

Last time MLA changed its citation style, it took EndNote several years to update its built in MLA style. So if you’re looking for an Output Style to use with EndNote that conforms (as much as possible) to the new MLA Handbook, 8th Edition, I’ve created files you can download and install.

  1. Drag the two style files that you find in this folder into the Styles folder that EndNote looks at (you can see where your own installation is looking by going to Preferences > Folder Locations).
  2. Set MLA 8th as your output style by opening EndNote, clicking the “Edit” menu and then “Output Styles.” You may need to click on “Open Style Manager” the first time, at which point it might be useful to check the box next to the new MLA styles so that they’re listed with your other “favorites.”
  3. Download and read this ReadMe file that includes special instructions on using EndNote with this Output Style. (For the sake of convenience, I will also put the ReadMe information here in this blog post.)

If you run into problems or come up with improvements, please let me know!

Using the Style

To make sure that EndNote generates good citations, here are some important things to know:

  • URLs for web sources other than library databases should be included, but do not include the “http://“ or “https://“ part. You will have to make this edit individually in the records for your items as there is no way that I know of to programmatically take those prefixes out of the URL in EndNote.
  • Fill in the “Date” field with the day and month, but not year, like so: “21 Jan.”
  • If your work has no listed author, be sure to include a “short title” in your record because this is what will show up in your in-text citations.
  • If your work’s author is also the publisher, leave the Author field blank.
  • If you are focusing on an aspect of the work done by a person who is not the creator of the main content, put that person’s name in the “Author” field. Then put a descriptive label (editor, performer, translator, etc.) in the “Label” field.
  • If you are looking at an “unexpected type of work” (a transcript of a broadcast, a manuscript of a published work, etc), put a descriptive word into the “Type of work” field (such as “Transcript” or “Manuscript”).

Special Instructions by Reference Type

Web Page:

  • Add the name of the web page within a site to the “Title” field, and the name of the full web site to “Series Title” field.
  • Do not include the year of the “Last updated date” as that will be duplicated from the “year” field. Instead enter the date in the this way: “26 Jan.”
  • Add the name of the organization that sponsored or published the web site to the “Publisher” field.

Film or Broadcast:

  • If you are treating the director as an author, put the name into the “Director” field. If you are treating the director as an Other Contributor, put the name into the “Credits” field.

Map:

  • If your map is part of a collection that has a title (such as “Google Maps”) put that title into the “Series Title” field.

Artwork

  • If you experienced a work first hand, put the location name (museum name, city name, etc) in the “Place Published” field.
  • If you found the work reproduced online, use the “Artwork” reference type and put the online database name in the “Database Name” field.
  • If you found the work reproduced in a book, magazine, etc., use the reference type that matches the thing where you found the reproduced artwork (“Book Section,” “Newspaper,” etc.)

Manuscript:

  • Put the word “Manuscript” in the “Type of Material” field. If you are using the Manuscript field for something other than a manuscript, then put a similarly descriptive word in the “Type of Material” field.

Caveats

The new MLA style gives people many, many options. Sadly, none of the reference managers that I know of are currently that flexible, so there are some things that are options in the style that people will not be able to do automatically using EndNote or any other software in their current states. Most notably, there is no good way, currently, to do the following:

  • Use a description (without quotation marks or italics) in place of a title for untitled works
  • Add the optional place of publication to citations
  • Add the optional access date to citations

To do these things and the other optional descriptive work allowed in the 8th edition, you’ll want to finish your final draft, save a new copy of your document, use the “Convert to plain text” option under “Tools” on your EndNote toolbar to break the connection with the EndNote program, and then do any final edits that the program cannot do for you.

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Get your applications in! The search is underway!

Come work with me! The search committee for our Reference & Instruction Liaison Librarian for Humanities and Digital Scholarship position is meeting soon to start reviewing applications, so get your application in soon. I’ve gotten a sneak peak at some of the job duties as I’ve been the interim digital scholarship person, and it’s really a neat area to be involved in on our campus. What started as an experiment is now growing wings, so it’s right at that interesting stage where there’s a lot going on and a great network of people to work with, but it isn’t a solidified program on campus so the new librarian will have plenty of room to move the program in interesting directions.

Also, you’d get to have a trading card made for you to match this year’s postcard theme.

Here’s the job ad:

Carleton College seeks a Reference and Instruction Librarian to join us in a lively, imaginative and team-based program of information resources and services. The library is committed to an intellectual partnership with the faculty in integrating information literacy into the curriculum of the college. Our information literacy program is linked to a college-wide initiative to address the basic literacies (information, quantitative, visual, writing, and speaking) that cut across the curriculum. Our digital scholarship work happens throughout the library and is done in close collaboration with colleagues on the faculty and in ITS.  We place a high value on a solid grounding in the world of scholarship, regardless of format.

This is an ideal position for an individual who is 1) looking for an opportunity to work in an institution focused on teaching, in collaboration with an unusually fine group of students, faculty and colleagues; 2) committed to excellence in teaching and to information literacy as a liberal art; 3) deeply rooted in and excited about humanities research; and 4) engaged in the methods of digital scholarship and its application to the liberal arts.

The full job description and application instructions can be found here: https://jobs.carleton.edu/postings/2456

Founded in 1866, Carleton is a private, highly selective liberal arts college with 1950 undergraduates located in Northfield, Minnesota, 45 miles south of Minneapolis and St. Paul. Best known for its academic excellence and warm, welcoming campus community, Carleton offers 37 majors and 15 concentrations in the arts, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. Carleton is committed to attracting and retaining a diverse group of faculty and staff and offers a comprehensive benefits package.

As they say in all the best commercials: Apply Today!

I’m happy to answer any questions you might have, or direct you to members of the search committee who can also answer questions. Or you can contact my department head (and search committee chair) Ann Zawistoski.

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Come work with me!

Photo by  Brenda Gottsabend
Photo by
Brenda Gottsabend

Have you been wanting to come work at Carleton? Here’s your opportunity!

The library at Carleton College seeks a Reference & Instruction librarian to join us in a lively, imaginative and team-based program of information resources and services. The library is committed to an intellectual partnership with the faculty in integrating information literacy into the curriculum of the college. Our information literacy program is linked to a college-wide initiative to address the basic literacies (information, quantitative, visual, writing, and speaking) that cut across the curriculum.

This is an ideal position for someone who is 1) looking for an opportunity to work in an institution focused on teaching, in collaboration with an unusually fine group of students, faculty and colleagues; 2) committed to excellence in teaching and to information literacy as a liberal art; and 3) deeply rooted in and excited about interdisciplinary or area studies. We place a high value on a solid grounding in the world of books and scholarly information.
The full job description and application instructions can be found here: https://jobs.carleton.edu/postings/2383
If you have any questions, feel free to contact either me or the Head of Reference and Instruction — we’re both on the search committee and happy to talk to you about the position. My contact information is here, and Ann’s is here.
Edited to add: Some people have asked if we are deliberately looking for entry-level librarians, and the answer is that we are deliberately NOT restricting our pool to only people who have a specific amount of experience. If you would like to come work with us, please apply!
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